CHAPTER 6:

A LIVELY OPENING

How did you get on with the opening we asked you to play in the last chapter? You were asked to play games with a variation of the Giuoco Piano which starts like this.

1. e2-e4 e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6
3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5
4. c2-c3

You might think this move looks a bit strange. You're moving a pawn instead of a piece, and, what's more, putting it on what seems to be the best square for the Knight on b1,. What's the idea? White is preparing to play d2-d4 next move to get two pawns together in the middle of the board. Later in the chapter you'll see some games which show you just how strong those pawns can be.

4... Ng8-f6

The most natural move, attacking the Pawn on e4.

5. d2-d4

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+n+-sn-+&
5+-vl-zp-+-%
4-+LzPP+-+$
3+-zP-+N+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1tRNvLQmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 76
Black to move

Giving the position in Diagram 76, which is as far as we took you in the last chapter.

White's last move is a FORK, attacking both the Bishop on c5 and the Pawn on e5. What should Black do? Let's try moving the Bishop.

Variation 1

5... Bc5-b6?

If you remember Chapter 3 you should be able to work out what happens next.

6. d4xe5 Nf6xe4?

7. Qd1-d5! (Diagram 77)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-vln+-+-+&
5+-+QzP-+-%
4-+L+n+-+$
3+-zP-+N+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1tRNvL-mK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 77
Black to move

A QUEEN FORK (remember?), attacking the Knight on e4 and threatening mate on f7. If the Knight moves to either d6 or g5 to defend the mate, White just takes it off.

Variation 2

5... Bc5-e7?
6. d4xe5 Nf6xe4?
7. Qd1-d5!

The same thing again. White wins a Knight.

Variation 3

5... Bc5-d6?!

It's nearly always wrong to put the Bishop in front of the d-pawn like this. Here's how White can set a trap.

6. d4xe5

A PAWN FORK, so Black has to take.

6... Nc6xe5?

A mistake! Bd6xe5 is the right move.

7. Nf3xe5 Bd6xe5
8. f2-f4 Be5-d6

9. e4-e5! (Diagram 78)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+-vl-sn-+&
5+-+-zP-+-%
4-+L+-zP-+$
3+-zP-+-+-#
2PzP-+-+PzP"
1tRNvLQmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 78
Black to move

Another PAWN FORK. winning either the Bishop or the Knight. If Black plays Nf6-e4 White should play Qd1-f3, keeping two pieces under attack, rather than risk 10. e5xd6 Qd8-h4+ 11. g2-g3 Ne4xg3 (remember that idea?). Or Black can try...

9... Qd8-e7

to PIN the e-pawn, but after...

10. Qd1-e2

Black is losing a piece.

So Black's best fifth move is to take the Pawn on d4:

Variation 4

(Go back to Diagram 76)

5... e5xd4
6. c3xd4

Where should Black move his Bishop? If he plays Bc5-b6 the White Pawns will advance and create havoc among the Black cavalry. You'll see an example of this later in the chapter. Black needs time to attack the White pawn centre, so he must check.

6... Bc5-b4+ (Diagram 79)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+n+-sn-+&
5+-+-+-+-%
4-vlLzPP+-+$
3+-+-+N+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1tRNvLQmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 79
White to move

Now White is at the road junction. He has two good moves to choose from: Bc1-d2 and Nb1-c3. We'll look at them in turn.

Variation 4A

7. Bc1-d2

This move looks as if it loses a pawn, but after...

Variation 4A1

7... Nf6xe4

White can win the pawn back. Can you work out how? We start with...

8. Bd2xb4 Nc6xb4 (Diagram 80)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+-+-+-+&
5+-+-+-+-%
4-snLzPn+-+$
3+-+-+N+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1tRN+QmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 80
White to move

9. Bc4xf7+!

9. Qd1-b3 at once also wins the pawn back (9... Qd8-e7 10. Bc4xf7+) but gives Black no problems.

9... Ke8xf7
10. Qd1-b3+ (FORK!) d7-d5
11. Nf3-e5+

This is stronger than taking the Knight at once. White's next move will be Qb3xb4, giving him a slight advantage because Black cannot castle.

Now go back to Diagram 79, play Bc1-d2 for White again, and play through...

Variation 4A2

7... Bb4xd2+
8. Nb1xd2

This is the only good way to recapture. After Qd1xd2 Black can take the e-pawn, and after Nf3xd2 he can take the d-pawn.

Now Black has to challenge the White pawn centre. A poor move for Black would be 0-0, which does nothing to stop the White infantry from advancing. The second best move is d7-d6, when the pawns can no longer advance with advantage, but White remains in control of more territory. Black's best plan is to break up the centre at once with...

8... d7-d5
9. e4xd5 Nf6xd5 (Diagram 81)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzp-+pzpp'
6-+n+-+-+&
5+-+n+-+-%
4-+LzP-+-+$
3+-+-+N+-#
2PzP-sN-zPPzP"
1tR-+QmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 81
White to move

The position is about equal.

Back again to Diagram 79 to look at a different idea for White.

Variation 4B

7. Nb1-c3

This move looks as if it doesn't lose a pawn, but it does.

7... Nf6xe4

The Knight on c3 is PINNED! But White has seen this coming. While Black stops to eat the Pawn, he'll just get on with his development. Another move for Black is d7-d5, which you saw in the game Steinitz-Von Bardeleben (Masters of the Universe 3). 0-0 is again a poor move here - you'll see why later in the chapter.

8. 0-0 (Diagram 82)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+n+-+-+&
5+-+-+-+-%
4-vlLzPn+-+$
3+-sN-+N+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1tR-vLQ+RmK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 82
Black to move

Now he is threatening the Knight on e4 so Black will capture on c3. Should he capture with the Bishop or the Knight?

Variation 4B1

8... Ne4xc3

This can be very dangerous for Black if he's not careful. Let's see what happens if he's too greedy.

9. b2xc3 Bb4xc3?!
10. Bc1-a3! Bc3xa1? (Diagram 83)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+n+-+-+&
5+-+-+-+-%
4-+LzP-+-+$
3vL-+-+N+-#
2P+-+-zPPzP"
1vl-+Q+RmK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 83
White to move

11. Rf1-e1+ Nc6-e7

In chess, as in real life, if you eat too many goodies you usually end up feeling pretty sick. And that's just what happens to Black here.

12. Re1xe7+ Ke8-f8?

Black's losing anyway, but he'd last longer by swallowing his pride (and an indigestion tablet) and giving up his Queen. Now White has two ways of mating quickly: 13. Re7xf7+ or the more spectacular...

13. Re7-e8+! Kf8xe8

It's double check: from the Bishop on a3 as well as the Rook, so he has no choice.

14. Qd1-e1+ Qd8-e7
15. Qe1xe7#

Now return to Diagram 82.

Variation 4B2

8... Bb4xc3

This is Black's safer choice here. Now White's best move is probably d4-d5 when things get very complicated. Too complicated for you to be bothered about at this stage in your chess career. Again, there's an example for you in the Activities section.

Instead White can set a trap by playing the obvious move.

9. b2xc3 (Diagram 84)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-+n+-+-+&
5+-+-+-+-%
4-+LzPn+-+$
3+-zP-+N+-#
2P+-+-zPPzP"
1tR-vLQ+RmK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 84
Black to move

Now Black's best move is d7-d5, when White doesn't have too much to show for the missing pawn. But suppose Black gets greedy again and tries Ne4xc3. What do you think happens then? Yes, it's yet another QUEEN FORK. Qd1-e1+ picks up the errant Knight next move.

Now see if you can use some of these ideas in your games. If you play this opening with White against an opponent who, poor fool, hasn't read this book, you stand a pretty good chance of winning quickly. But don't JUST learn the moves off by heart. Learn the reasons for the moves as well, and make sure you know which are the best moves for Black, in case someone plays the opening against you.

QUIZ

Instead of a written quiz this chapter, your teacher will test you on the opening variations in this chapter. If you're working through the book at home play some more games with these variations against your training partner or computer. There will be a mini-quiz on this opening in the next chapter.

ACTIVITIES

To understand more about this opening, play through these games. They're all wins for White, so take the White side and see if you can guess his moves.

This is the sort of thing that happens if Black doesn't keep White's pawn centre under control. The winner of this game was a 14-year-old Russian boy who later became a very strong Grandmaster.

White: Igor Boleslavsky Black: Scitov
Moscow 1933

1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5 4. c2-c3 Ng8-f6 5. d2-d4 e5xd4 6. c3xd4 Bc5-b6? 7. e4-e5 Nf6-g4 8. h2-h3 Ng4-h6 9. d4-d5 Nc6-e7 10. d5-d6 Ne7-g6? 11. Bc1-g5 (Diagram 85)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwqk+-tr(
7zppzpp+pzpp'
6-vl-zP-+nsn&
5+-+-zP-vL-%
4-+L+-+-+$
3+-+-+N+P#
2PzP-+-zPP+"
1tRN+QmK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 85
Black to move

11... f7-f6 12. e5xf6 g7xf6 13. Qd1-e2+ Ke8-f8 14. Bg5xh6# 10

In the next game Black manages to get move 6 right but goes wrong on move 7. Again the white pawns advance strongly.

White: Ruger Black: Gebhard
Dresden 1915

1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5 4. c2-c3 Ng8-f6 5. d2-d4 e5xd4 6. c3xd4 Bc5-b4+ 7. Nb1-c3 00? 8. d4-d5 Nc6-e7 9. e4-e5 Nf6-e4 10. Qd1-c2 Ne4xc3 11. b2xc3 Bb4-c5 12. Nf3-g5 (Threatening mate on h7. Now if 12... f7-f5, 13. d5-d6 (DISCOVERED CHECK!) wins a Knight, or if 12... g7-g6 13. Ng5-e4 Bc5-b6 14. Bc1-h6 Rf8-e8 15. Ne4-f6+ (FORK!) wins Rook for Knight.) 12... Ne7-g6 13. h2-h4 h7-h6 (Diagram 86)

XABCDEFGH
8r+lwq-trk+(
7zppzpp+pzp-'
6-+-+-+nzp&
5+-vlPzP-sN-%
4-+L+-+-zP$
3+-zP-+-+-#
2P+Q+-zPP+"
1tR-vL-mK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 86
White to move

14. d5-d6! (Opening up the line between the White Bishop and the Black King so that the Pawn on f7 is PINNED and White threatens Qc2xg6 (EXPLOITING THE PIN!)). 14... h6xg5 15. h4xg5 Rf8-e8 (The Knight cannot move from g6 because of Qc2-h7#, supported by the Rook on h1.) 16. Qc2xg6 Re8xe5+ 17. Ke1-f1 (Definitely NOT Bc4-e2, when the f-pawn is no longer pinned and Black can take the Queen.) Black resigns: he cannot avoid mate for very long.

If you want to play Variation 4B against strong opponents you need to know the following game.

White: B Edwards Black: B Hoffman

Indianapolis 1948

1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5 4. c2-c3 Ng8-f6 5. d2-d4 e5xd4 6. c3xd4 Bc5-b4+ 7. Nb1-c3 Nf6xe4 8. 00 Bb4xc3 9. d4-d5 Nc6-e5?! (Looks tempting as Black seems to be winning a piece but Bc3-f6 is much better.) 10. b2xc3 Ne5xc4 11. Qd1-d4 Nc4-d6?! 12. Qd4xg7 Qd8-f6 13. Qg7xf6 Ne4xf6 14. Rf1-e1+ Ke8-f8? (14... Ke8-d8 loses to 15. Bc1-g5 Nd6-e8 16. Re1xe8+! (DESTROY!) 16... Rh8xe8 177. Bg5xf6+ Re8-e7 18. Ra1-e1 (ATTACK A PINNED PIECE!) and White comes out a piece up, but better is 14... Nf6-e4.) 15. Bc1-h6+ Kf8-g8 16. Re1-e5 Nd6-e4 (Diagram 87) (16... Nf6-e4 is better but White can win with 17. Ra1-e1 f7-f5 18. Re5-e7 b7-b6 19. Nf3-e5 Bc8-b7 20. Re7-g7+ Kg8-f8 21. Rg7xh7+ (DISCOVERED CHECK!) Kf8-g8 22. Rh7-g7+ Kg8-f8 23. Ne5-g6+ (FORK!)).

XABCDEFGH
8r+l+-+ktr(
7zppzpp+p+p'
6-+-+-sn-vL&
5+-+PtR-+-%
4-+-+n+-+$
3+-zP-+N+-#
2P+-+-zPPzP"
1tR-+-+-mK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 87
White to move

17. Nf3-d2! (DECOY!) 17... d7-d6 (or 17... Ne4xd2 18. Re5-g5#) 18. Nd2xe4 (DECOY!) 18... d6xe5 (or 18... Nf6xe4 19. Re5-e8#) 19. Ne4xf6# This had all been published years before the game took place. White had no doubt seen it all before. Black lost because he hadn't read the right books.

Finally, an example of play from Variation 4A. Watch how White feeds his pieces across to the King side for a winning attack. Look out also for White's sensational 23rd move, one of the most spectacular ever seen on a chessboard.

White: Nicolas Rossolimo Black: Reissmann
San Juan 1967

1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Ng1-f3 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5 4. c2-c3 Ng8-f6 5. d2-d4 e5xd4 6. c3xd4 Bc5-b4+ 7. Bc1-d2 Bb4xd2+ 8. Nb1xd2 d7-d5 9. e4xd5 Nf6xd5 10. Qd1-b3 Nc6-e7 11. 0-0 0-0 12. Rf1-e1 c7-c6 13. a2-a4 b7-b6? (Qd8-c7 and Qd8-b6, amongst over moves, are better than this.) 14. Nf3-e5 Bc8-b7 15. a4-a5 Ra8-c8 16. Nd2-e4 Qd8-c7 17. a5-a6 Bb7-a8 18. Qb3-h3 Nd5-f4 19. Qh3-g4 Ne7-d5 20. Ra1-a3 (Preparing to swing the Rook across to the other side.) 20... Nf4-e6? 21. Bc4xd5 c6xd5 22. Ne4-f6+ (EXPLOITING THE PIN!) Kg8-h8 (Diagram 88)

XABCDEFGH
8l+r+-tr-mk(
7zp-wq-+pzpp'
6Pzp-+nsN-+&
5+-+psN-+-%
4-+-zP-+Q+$
3tR-+-+-+-#
2-zP-+-zPPzP"
1+-+-tR-mK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 88
White to move
(Can you find two winning moves for White here?) 23. Qg4-g6!! (Amazing! If Black takes the Queen he's soon mated: 23... h7xg6 24. Ra3-h3# or 23... f7xg6 24. Ne5xg6+! h7xg6 25. Ra3-h3# The other winning move, also a QUEEN SACRIFICE, was Qg4xe6!. If you found either, or, better still, both these moves, congratulations!) 23... Qc7-c2 24. Ra3-h3! Black resigns (He still can't take the Queen: 23... h7xg6 is now illegal, 23... f7xg6 now allows Rh3xh7# and after 23... Qc2xg6 we have 24. Ne5xg6+ f7xg6 25. Rh3xh7#.)

Don't think that, just because White wins all these games, the opening is very good for White. The truth is that, if Black knows what he's doing and avoids all the traps he'll get at least an equal game. But there are very many pitfalls along the route.

Masters of the Universe 6

The Cuban prodigy Capablanca's reign as World Champion was surprisingly short. In 1927 he lost to his first challenger, Alexander Alekhine, in a marathon match. Alekhine won six games, lost three, with no less than 25 draws!

Alekhine was born in Moscow in 1892 and at the age of seven was taught chess by his mother. He played a lot with his older brother, but in those days children were not usually allowed to go to chess clubs so they played postal games against strong opponents.

He was 14 when he played in his first tournament at Moscow Chess Club. At first he didn't do very well but within just over a year he had reached master standard. By the age of 21 he was one of the world's best players.

In the early 1920s he left Russia and settled in Paris, in time becoming a French citizen.

After becoming World Champion in 1927 he defended his title twice against Efim Bogoljubow, who had been born in the Ukraine but lived in Germany. But in 1935 he underestimated his next opponent, the Dutchman Dr Max Euwe, and met with an unexpected defeat. Two years later he played a return match against Euwe and this time won easily.

International chess was interrupted by the Second World War, so Alekhine was still World Champion when he died in 1946.

Like Kasparov, who has described Alekhine as his hero, Alekhine was a brilliant and daring attacking player. Even today his games are many people's favourites. If you find any of his games in books you'll enjoy playing them through. Here are two for you to be going on with. This game was played in 1908, probably just before his 16th birthday.

White: Alexander Alekhine Black: V Romanov
Moscow 1908
Opening: Owen's Defence

1. e2-e4 b7-b6
2. d2-d4 Bc8-b7
3. Nb1-c3 e7-e6
4. Ng1-f3 d7-d5?
5. Bf1-b5+ c7-c6
6. Bb5-d3

White was happy to spend a move forcing Black to play c7-c6, blocking in his Bishop on b7.

6... Ng8-f6?
7. e4-e5 Nf6-d7

Black has played the opening badly. White can already start to attack.

8. Nf3-g5!

Threatening to win by 9. Ng5xe6! f7xe6 10. Qd1-h5+ Ke8-e7 11. Bc1-g5+ (SKEWER!) or 10... g7-g6 11. Bd3xg6+ (EXPLOITING THE PIN!)

8... Bf8-e7
9. Qd1-g4 Nd7-f8?
10. Ng5xh7! Rh8xh7

If 10... Nf8xh7 White plays Qg4xg7 (FORK!).

11. Bd3xh7 Nf8xh7
12. Qg4xg7 Nh7-f8 (Diagram 89)

XABCDEFGH
8rsn-wqksn-+(
7zpl+-vlpwQ-'
6-zpp+p+-+&
5+-+pzP-+-%
4-+-zP-+-+$
3+-sN-+-+-#
2PzPP+-zPPzP"
1tR-vL-mK-+R!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 89
White to move

13. h2-h4!

This move wins the Black Queen! Black's pieces are so badly placed that White threatens simply to push this pawn through to h8. The only way to stop this is to take the pawn off. So...

13... Be7xh4
14. Rh1xh4! Qd8xh4
15. Bc1-g5 Qh4-h1+
16. Ke1-d2 Qh1xg2
17. Qg7-f6 (Diagram 90)
XABCDEFGH
8rsn-+ksn-+(
7zpl+-+p+-'
6-zpp+pwQ-+&
5+-+pzP-vL-%
4-+-zP-+-+$
3+-sN-+-+-#
2PzPPmK-zPq+"
1tR-+-+-+-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 90
Black to move

Menacing mate on e7 or d8. Black can only stop both threats by giving up his Queen. (This is why he had to take the Pawn rather than the Rook on a1 last move.) Black could safely resign here with only Bishop and Knight for Queen in a hopelessly cramped position.

17... Qg2xg5+
18. Qf6xg5 Nf8-g6
19. f2-f4 Ng6-e7
20. Ra1-h1 Nb8-d7
21. Nc3-d1 Nd7-f8
22. Nd1-e3 Bb7-c8
23. Ne3-g4 Bc8-d7
24. Rh1-h8 (PIN!) Ne7-g6
25. Ng4-f6+ Ke8-d8
26. Qg5xg6! (DESTROY!, EXPLOITING THE PIN!)

Black resigns: after 26... f7xg6 27. Rh8xf8+ (SKEWER!) and 28. Rf8xa8 White is a Rook ahead.

Finally, a quick win against a veteran ex-champion.

White: Alexander Alekhine Black: Emanuel Lasker
Zurich 1934
Opening: Queen's Gambit Declined

1. d2-d4 d7-d5
2. c2-c4 e7-e6
3. Nb1-c3 Ng8-f6
4. Ng1-f3 Bf8-e7
5. Bc1-g5 Nb8-d7
6. e2-e3 0-0
7. Ra1-c1 c7-c6
8. Bf1-d3 d5xc4
9. Bd3xc4 Nf6-d5
10. Bg5xe7 Qd8xe7
11. Nc3-e4 Nd5-f6
12. Ne4-g3 e6-e5
13. 0-0 e5xd4
14. Ng3-f5 Qe7-d8
15. Nf3xd4 Nd7-e5
16. Bc4-b3 Bc8xf5
17. Nd4xf5 Qd8-b6?

So far the game, a typical Queen's Gambit Declined, has been fairly equal but this move allows White a very strong attack. According to Alekhine, Black's best move is g7-g6, to drive away the troublesome Knight.

XABCDEFGH
8r+-+-trk+(
7zpp+-+pzpp'
6-wqp+-sn-+&
5+-+-snN+-%
4-+-+-+-+$
3+L+-zP-+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1+-tRQ+RmK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 91
White to move
18. Qd1-d6!

Attacking a Knight!

18... Ne5-d7

Ne5-g6 would have been answered by Nf5-h6+! (DECOY!), smashing up Black's defences.

19. Rf1-d1 Ra8-d8
20. Qd6-g3

Threatening mate!

20... g7-g6
21. Qg3-g5

Now the idea is 22. Rd1-d6, and if 22... Nf6-e4, 23. Rd6xg6+! (DESTROY!) 23... h7xg6 24. Qg5xg6+ (EXPLOITING THE PIN!) 24... Kg8-h8 25. Qg6-g7#.

21... Kg8-h8
22. Nf5-d6

Attacking f7!

22. Kh8-g7
23. e3-e4 Nf6-g8
24. Rd1-d3 f7-f6

After 24... h7-h6, Alekhine would have won with 25. Nd6-f5+ Kg7-h7 26. Nf5xh6 f7-f6 27. Nh6-f5!! (A QUEEN SACRIFICE!) 27...f6xg5 28. Rd3-h3+ Ng8-h6 29. Rh3xh6#. See if you can work out the wins after Black's other defences in this variation.

25. Nd6-f5+

EXPLOITING THE PIN!

25... Kg7-h8 (Diagram 92)

XABCDEFGH
8-+-tr-trnmk(
7zpp+n+-+p'
6-wqp+-zpp+&
5+-+-+NwQ-%
4-+-+P+-+$
3+L+R+-+-#
2PzP-+-zPPzP"
1+-tR-+-mK-!
xabcdefgh
Diagram 92
White to move
26. Qg5xg6!!

Another QUEEN SACRIFICE, but this time on g6 rather than on g5 in the variation given after Black's 24th move. Now the threat is Qg6-g7#, and if 27... h7xg6, 27. Rd3-h3+ and mate next move. So Black resigned.
LESSONS FROM CHAPTER 6

1. THE CENTRE IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF THE BOARD. TRY TO USE YOUR PAWNS TO OCCUPY AND CONTROL THE CENTRE.

2. LOOK FOR OPPORTUNITIES TO ADVANCE YOUR CENTRE PAWNS TO ATTACK YOUR OPPONENT'S PIECES AND DRIVE THEM ROUND THE BOARD.

3. DON'T DEVELOP YOUR BISHOP IN FRONT OF YOUR d-PAWN (as in Variation 3).

4. DON'T BE TOO GREEDY IN THE OPENING. DEVELOP YOUR PIECES QUICKLY RATHER THAN TRY TO WIN TOO MUCH MATERIAL.